The “Paramount Threats” To The Income Security Of Those In – And Those Approaching – Retirement Today

2018-04-12 17_49_17-Free stock photos of planning · Pexels“There are factors threatening your plans for lifetime income security,” cautions the author of today’s article, who further observes that, while some of these factors are nothing new, “others are relatively new, or are becoming more significant.” He proceeds to detail the five trends and factors that he sees as the “paramount threats” to the income security of those in – and those approaching – retirement today. What are these threats – and how can you adapt your retirement plan to mitigate their potential impact? CLICK HERE.

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Some (Not So) Fun Facts About Retirement

2017-11-26 20_58_39-Scenic View of Beach · Free Stock Photo“While the post-work years can truly be golden for those who plan for them, many retirees are caught off guard by the facts of their new life,” warns the author of today’s article. He proceeds to outline several facts about retirement that, while not necessarily fun facts, are things that he believes those approaching retirement should be cognizant of before leaving the workforce for good. To read more, CLICK HERE.

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From “Go Go” To “No Go”: Structuring Your Portfolio For The Unique Phases Of Retirement

2017-11-19 09_17_54-pexels-photo-277052.jpeg (3264×2448)With retirement comes a shift from receiving a consistent paycheck to needing to tap your various income streams to cover your various expenses – and the author of today’s article argues that “this shift requires a new investment strategy and mindset.” In order to develop this strategy and mindset, she advises to think of retirement as consisting of three unique stages – the “Go Go” years, the “Slow Go” years, and the “No Go” years – and outlines “five key areas” to address when it comes to planning for each of these stages. For more, CLICK HERE.

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Even If You Have A Retirement Plan, Is It Viable?

2017-10-09 05_29_36-Man Walking in the Forest · Free Stock PhotoIf you even have a retirement plan at all you are undoubtedly ahead of most Americans. Still, even if you have taken this important step, the question needs to be asked: is the retirement plan you have drafted viable? The author of today’s article outlines how pre-retirees can go about assessing the adequacy of their savings rate – and how retirees can gauge the sustainability of their spending rate. For the steps involved in these tasks – and some online tools for completing them – CLICK HERE.

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Be On Guard Against These Retirement-Wrecking Mistakes

2017-10-01 15_40_56-Free stock photo of blur, business, close-upThere are many actions (and inactions) that can wreck retirement plans. As such, while the author of today’s article acknowledges that the $1 million figure frequently cited as how much one needs to amass for a comfortable retirement may be arbitrary, he stresses that “what is not arbitrary is it takes discipline and it requires avoiding mistakes and pitfalls to have a happy retirement.” He proceeds to identify 14 specific mistakes that retirement savers should be on guard against making – including failing to understand how Social Security works. For more, CLICK HERE.

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Mapping A Million: How Far A $1 Million Nest Egg Will Get You, By State

2017-08-27 12_54_30-Close Up of Pictures · Free Stock PhotoHow far a $1 million nest egg will get you in retirement depends on where that retirement takes place. Today’s article highlights the findings of a new report which assessed how many years $1 million would last for retirees 65 and older for each state, with numbers ranging from 26.3 years in one state to 11.9 years in another. Where will a million last the longest, where will it last the shortest – and how far will a million get you in your expected retirement state? CLICK HERE to find out.

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The Latest Salvo In The Government’s Efforts To Make It Harder To Save For Retirement

2017-08-06 16_56_27-Brown Leather Wallet Using Blue Steel Clap · Free Stock PhotoA significant percentage of Americans are not saving enough (or at all) for retirement – and the U.S. government seems to be doing everything it can to exacerbate this problem. The latest example of this is the Treasury Department’s canceling of the Obama-era myRA program for individuals who did not have access to a 401(k) or other retirement plan at work. What other actions has the government taken this year that could make saving for retirement more difficult – and what are retirement savers to do in the face of this? CLICK HERE to read more.

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Creating An In-Retirement Financial Plan

2017-04-23 12_35_01-Free stock photo of arm, desk, handThe transition from building up savings leading up to retirement to spending down those savings once in retirement can be challenging, both strategically and psychologically – and thus mapping out an in-retirement financial plan is critical, notes the author of today’s article. To aid in this complicated endeavor, she lays out “the key tasks to tackle” when devising such a plan – including deciding whether to annuitize a portion of your portfolio (and, if so, how much), determining your withdrawal sequencing, and coming up with a succession plan for your portfolio. To read more, CLICK HERE.

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“Dangerous Drawbacks”: How The GOP’s Medicare Reform Plan Could Imperil Retirees

2017-02-18 20_39_01-Black Sphygmomanometer · Free Stock PhotoPremium support. This is the term for the GOP Medicare reform plan in which retirees would receive an annual stipend or voucher to purchase private health insurance, and the author of today’s article notes that, after recently analyzing the GOP premium support plan, the AARP Public Policy Institute concluded that “it would imperil retirees.” For the main points from AARP’s report on which this conclusion is based – including what the author sees as “the cruelest part of premium support” – CLICK HERE.

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Battle Plan For “The Coming Retirement Crisis”

2016-10-09 07_59_06-Films & TVThe author of today’s article divides the 10,000 baby boomers that are turning 65 each day into two groups: those that will depend on Social Security as a major source of income in retirement and those that have more savings and will therefore be less reliant on Social Security. To those in the latter group, however, she cautions that “it’s too soon to pat yourself on the back and relax. You need a retirement war chest unless you’re in the top 1% of net worth and/or you have amazingly generous pensions.” As such, she lays out a series of do’s and don’ts for navigating “the coming retirement crisis” (e.g. Do retire as late as you can. Don’t drain retirement savings to support aging parents). To read more, CLICK HERE.

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